EPISODE SHOW NOTES

Episode 25: Rejecting Diet Culture

When she developed the body kindness approach Rebecca Scritchfield, a well-being coach, registered dietitian nutritionist, and ACSM certified exercise physiologist, ditched diet culture and its fear-based control forever.

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Alarmed by the dangerous degree to which the health and the weight loss industry have become enmeshed and how their messages about body size and sexiness lead to weight cycling, disordered eating, and anxiety, Rebecca rejected her field’s traditional view of what fitness and wellbeing look like. A champion of fat activism and the health at every size movement, her work shines a light on this much-needed culture shift and promotes body kindness and autonomy for all.

Rebecca Scritchfield is a well-being coach, registered dietitian nutritionist, ACSM certified exercise physiologist, and author of the book, Body Kindness: Transform your health from the inside out and never say diet again (Workman Publishing), which Publisher’s Weekly calls “a rousing guide to better health” and The New York Times Book Review calls “simple and true”.

Through her weight-inclusive Body Kindness counseling practice, Rebecca helps people reject diets and body shame to create a better life with workable, interesting self-care goals to fit individual’s needs and preferences, not society’s unrealistic weight and beauty standards.

Rebecca has influenced millions through her writing, podcast, workshops, and appearances in over 100 media outlets including NBC Nightly News, CNN, the TODAY show, O Magazine, Real Simple, Time, and many others. Rebecca is a freelance writer for The Washington Post and Self magazine, an advisor to Health Magazine (2019) and Diversify Dietetics, and a mom of two young girls. She lives in Washington, D.C., where she was recognized as one of ten “Supermom” entrepreneurs in the Nation’s Capital.

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ABOUT YOUR HOST

I’m a writer, a teacher, a native New Yorker, and I love hearing about people’s lives. When I think back to my elementary school days at PS 20 in Flushing, Queens whenever we began social studies or a history lesson I wasn’t that interested in learning about battles, topography, or politics. What I wanted to know was how people lived: What their families were like, how they adapted to their circumstances, what they ate, how they celebrated, how they felt.
 
Sociology became my major at Binghamton University and in my life so far I’ve been an actress, a salesperson, a Zoo Keeper’s Aid, a volunteer animal trainer, an ELL teacher, a mother, and a wife. I’m grateful for the experiences I’ve had, all of which led me to create this podcast which is one of the most rewarding projects I’ve undertaken. I couldn’t ask for a better job than having in-depth conversations with survivors, thought leaders, authors, social justice warriors, and people who believe that we are all connected and then getting to share their stories, insight, and vulnerability with listeners.
 
I’m so glad you’ve landed on this page. I hope you find stories here which resonate with you and that you’ll tune in every week. 
 
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ATEC (Episode 10) (ATEC Pin 3)