EPISODE SHOW NOTES

Episode 17:
The Immigrant Crisis is Not Over

Tahmina Watson could not have predicted she’d become a US immigration lawyer when she began her career as a barrister in the UK, but she soon realized helping people become citizens was her purpose in life. And when the Trump administration released its executive orders on immigration in 2017 she saw her assistance was direly needed.

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She went to work immediately and established the Washington Immigrant Defense Network and helped mobilize Airport Lawyers to directly assist distressed families and passengers. Three years later and she and her team have learned that under the current administration parents and children continue to be separated, virtually anybody is deportable, and the immigration crisis is not over.

In this episode, Tahmina talks about how this is the calm before the storm, that immigrant issues are everybody’s issues, and the ways even lay people can help.

Tahmina Watson is a nationally acclaimed immigration attorney and founder of Watson Immigration Law in Seattle, Washington, USA. Her practice specifically focuses on business and investment immigration matters.  She regularly handles all employment-based visas such as L1A, H1B, O1, E2, EB5 etc. She serves individuals and businesses from all over the world.

Tahmina was a barrister in London, UK, before immigrating to America herself.  She is an Adjunct Fellow with the Niskanen Center, a policy think tank in Washington, DC.  A passionate advocate for immigration reform, Tahmina is the author of “The Startup Visa: Key to Job Growth & Economic Prosperity in America”.

In addition to appearing in various media including CNN, Forbes and much more, she is the host of “Tahmina Talks Immigration” a radio show turned podcast available on iTunes.  Recently, Tahmina founded a non-profit, the Washington Immigrant Defense Network- WIDEN which funds and facilitates legal representation in the immigration courtroom.

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ABOUT YOUR HOST

I’m a writer, a teacher, a native New Yorker, and I love hearing about people’s lives. When I think back to my elementary school days at PS 20 in Flushing, Queens whenever we began social studies or a history lesson I wasn’t that interested in learning about battles, topography, or politics. What I wanted to know was how people lived: What their families were like, how they adapted to their circumstances, what they ate, how they celebrated, how they felt.
 
Sociology became my major at Binghamton University and in my life so far I’ve been an actress, a salesperson, a Zoo Keeper’s Aid, a volunteer animal trainer, an ELL teacher, a mother, and a wife. I’m grateful for the experiences I’ve had, all of which led me to create this podcast which is one of the most rewarding projects I’ve undertaken. I couldn’t ask for a better job than having in-depth conversations with survivors, thought leaders, authors, social justice warriors, and people who believe that we are all connected and then getting to share their stories, insight, and vulnerability with listeners.
 
I’m so glad you’ve landed on this page. I hope you find stories here which resonate with you and that you’ll tune in every week. 
 
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